Category Archives: Environmenstrual

GRAB AN ENVIRONMENSTRUAL DISCOUNT CODE!

Want to give plastic free periods a try?  We have some discount codes for menstrual cups, washable pads, period pants and menstrual pads and tampons. Sign up below to receive upcoming news about the Environmenstrual Campaign, Environmenstrual Week and an email with money saving codes from our partners: Albanyone, Grace & Green, The Cup Effect, OrganiCup,…

SCHOOL GUIDELINES FOR PERIOD PRODUCTS MAY NEED AN OVERHAUL

Environmenstrual Coalition raises concerns with Department for Education over its advice to schools on how pupils should use reusable menstrual products. In an open letter, businesses, organisations and charities are urging the Department for Education to amend their advice given to schools on how pupils should use reusable menstrual products.

ENVIRONMENSTRUAL WEEK OF ACTION

We’re excited to announce that the theme for the 3rd annual Environmenstrual Week of Action (EWOA 2020) will be “Period Parity”. The week of activism from 19th – 25th October will advocate for improving access to plastic-free period products and shed light on how reusables, in particular, can play a unique role in tackling period poverty. People with periods should have equal access to impartial period education and a range of products, reusables being no exception.

PERIOD EDUCATION PROGRAMME

Did you know that Tampax and Lil Lets give free menstrual education in schools? Wen thinks it’s pretty dodgy that corporations that profit from disposable menstrual products are in charge of educating young people about their menstrual health. Often boys are left out of the discussion and details of correct disposal and reusable alternatives are…

HOW EFFECTIVE ARE MENSTRUAL CAMPAIGNS IN REACHING BAME WOMEN?

Mainstream activism into women’s menstrual experiences place ‘women’ as a standalone category and does not take into consideration minority women’s intersecting identities or their socioeconomic status. Research shows the BAME community are the most vulnerable and excluded segment of society. This means they are at higher risk of period poverty, menstrual stigmatization, and underrepresentation in discussions regards to menstrual health issues