FEMINIST GREEN NEW DEAL POLICY PAPERS

Header for Feminist Green New Deal Policy papers

As part of the Feminist Green New Deal project, our partner, the Women’s Budget Group has published policy papers outlining some of the key areas that need to be considered when building a green, low carbon, caring economy.  You can read the policy papers below – more will be added over the coming months. 

You can read the full Draft Roadmap and Feminist Green New Deal Policy Paper

Policy papers include:

  • Revitalising local communities and devolving power
  • Rethinking housing supply and design
  • Gender Inclusive and Sustainable Transport Systems

  • Managing Risk Through Security: Social security’s contribution to tackling climate change and gender inequality

  • Labour Market Changes for a Green, Caring Economy

  • A shorter working week as part of a green caring economy

  • Protecting Women’s Incomes with a Green, Caring Economy (Coming soon)

  • Sustainable living changes (Coming soon)
  • Greening finance and central banking (Coming soon)
  • Food systems (Coming soon)



REVITALISING LOCAL COMMUNITIES

Communities

This paper proposes placing the meeting of needs at the centre of all economic, social and political activity in order to revitalise communities in a way that enables a low-carbon, gender equal future. It explores how the fundamental needs of nutrition, shelter, social participation, health, physical and income security, can be met in a way that is consistent with green and feminist aims. Read the full report

RETHINKING HOUSING SUPPLY AND DESIGN

Housing policy paper feminist green new deal

Housing is fundamental to life, security and wellbeing as well as tackling climate change and working towards a zero-carbon future. It also remains a key site of gender and intersectional inequality, with design that does not accommodate diverse needs or care responsibilities, with mortgages and rents out of reach, and a suburban ideal that requires a car for daily living and can isolate women and children in the home. Housing investment as a central part of a Green New Deal (GND) —with a commitment to full funding from central government to ensure costs are never passed on to residents or local communities – would open up an incredible 

opportunity to centre a new vision of equality and care capable of transforming both landscapes and lives. It would also acknowledge and begin to address the connections between climate crisis and housing crisis, reducing housing’s contribution to the UK’s carbon footprint even as it reverses the rise of homelessness and houses the estimated 8 million people are in housing need. Read the full report

TOWARDS GENDER INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT SYSTEMS

To decarbonise transport and democratise the right to safe mobility, our transport systems must be inclusive and sustainable. This paper discusses four key structural factors that create gender disparities in transport systems and must be addressed to decarbonise transport in a just and inclusive way: access to economic resources and free time, car-centric policy and planning, safety and accessibility, and the technocratic paradigm in transport. Read the full report

MANAGING RISK THROUGH SECURITY: SOCIAL SECURITY’S CONTRIBUTION TO TACKLING CLIMATE CHANGE AND GENDER INEQUALITY

Social security is an important part of a package of social and economic policies which could mitigate climate change. Such policies should not disadvantage people on low incomes and women, so both environmental sustainability and gender equality must be considered. This paper focuses on the UK social security system, drawing on a more detailed social security paper for forthcoming publication by the Women’s Budget Group. Social security reforms have been discussed for many years, with no easy answers, but this paper identifies potential tradeoffs and directions to explore. Read the full report

LABOUR MARKET CHANGES FOR A GREEN, CARING ECONOMY

caring economy - feminist green new deal

Our vision for a green and caring economy calls for an economy and society based around principles of wellbeing1 and care. This will be crucial for addressing two of the biggest challenges facing us today, the climate and care crises. The end goal is a society in which environmental justice is realised alongside social justice, ensuring the transition to and the maintenance of a sustainable economy is just, fair and equal, with no one left behind. One central aspect of transitioning to a green and caring economy will be greening the labour market. Beyond greening high-polluting sectors, this will require a full transformation of all jobs to become green. Read the full report

A SHORTER WORKING WEEK AS PART OF A GREEN CARING ECONOMY

Shorter working week

Britain faces a number of intersecting crises, with inequalities and environmental breakdown at their core. Women continue to work longer hours than men, but men are paid for more of their work, and are paid more for their work. Meanwhile, overwork and overproduction are a direct cause of climate change – a point which is increasingly recognised around the world. In this brief, we argue that a shorter working week, as part of a wider set of policy changes, can promote gender-equal distributions in paid work, unpaid work, and income, while facilitating a green transition. Read the full report

Read about Feminist Green New Deal

 

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